tr/en/de
Aritificial Cornea
Who might need artificial cornea?
Success rate of cornea transplant in developed countries and in eyes that offer a suitable environment for the transplanted cornea to live is about 90%. However, success rate of cornea transplant significantly decreases in patients who have had cornea rejection for immunological and underlying recurring infectious (i.e.: herpes virus) reasons, in patients who experience wide-spread cornea vascularization, in patients who have stem cell deficiency by birth, such as aniridia, or developed later, and in patients who have intraocular silicon oil due to previous retina surgeries. Artificial corneas (Keratoprostheses) offer a new ray of hope for patients where corneas transplanted from cadavers have a low chance of survival or maintaining their transparency.
What is Boston Keratoprosthesis?
Boston Keratoprosthesis is currently the most widely used artificial cornea globally. Developing of this keratoprosthesis first started in 1960s, was approved by the FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration) in 1992, and has been performed on patients since. Its design was improved over the years for better results and has been performed on over 3500 patients across the globe. However, it has not become a routine practice in Turkey up to now, and was performed on few patients.
Because the centre of the Boston keratoprosthesis is transparent and is made of a plastic that does not stimulate the immune system, there is no risk of body rejecting it. Due to keratoprostheses´ shape and design, eye-glasses are not needed after the surgery or eye-glass numbers after the surgery are very low. The best vision is reached shortly following the surgery. While Keratoprosthesis surgery is similar to standard cornea transplant surgery, follow-up after the surgery is crucial and patients should be in close contact with their doctors. Patients need to use eye-drops for life following the surgery and compliance with this matter is very important.
Who might need artificial cornea?

Success rate of cornea transplant in developed countries and in eyes that offer a suitable environment for the transplanted cornea to live is about 90%. However, success rate of cornea transplant significantly decreases in patients who have had cornea rejection for immunological and underlying recurring infectious (i.e.: herpes virus) reasons, in patients who experience wide-spread cornea vascularization, in patients who have stem cell deficiency by birth, such as aniridia, or developed later, and in patients who have intraocular silicon oil due to previous retina surgeries. Artificial corneas (Keratoprostheses) offer a new ray of hope for patients where corneas transplanted from cadavers have a low chance of survival or maintaining their transparency.

What is Boston Keratoprosthesis?

Boston Keratoprosthesis is currently the most widely used artificial cornea globally. Developing of this keratoprosthesis first started in 1960s, was approved by the FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration) in 1992, and has been performed on patients since. Its design was improved over the years for better results and has been performed on over 3500 patients across the globe. However, it has not become a routine practice in Turkey up to now, and was performed on few patients.

Because the centre of the Boston keratoprosthesis is transparent and is made of a plastic that does not stimulate the immune system, there is no risk of body rejecting it. Due to keratoprostheses´ shape and design, eye-glasses are not needed after the surgery or eye-glass numbers after the surgery are very low. The best vision is reached shortly following the surgery. While Keratoprosthesis surgery is similar to standard cornea transplant surgery, follow-up after the surgery is crucial and patients should be in close contact with their doctors. Patients need to use eye-drops for life following the surgery and compliance with this matter is very important.